Depression

Depression is a constant feeling of sadness and loss of interest, which stops you doing your normal activities. It is a mental illness that may be mild or severe. 

While we all feel sad, moody or low from time to time, some people experience these feelings intensely, for long periods of time (weeks, months or even years) and sometimes without any apparent reason.  

Depression is more than just a low mood – it's a serious condition that has an impact on both physical and mental health. 

In any one year, around one million people in Australia experience depression. One in six women and one in eight men will experience depression at some time in their life. The good news is, depression is treatable and effective treatments are available. 

What to look for 

  • Depression affects how people think, feel and act.  
  • Depression makes it more difficult to manage from day to day and interferes with study, work and relationships. 

A person may be depressed if for more than two weeks they have felt sad, down or miserable most of the time or have lost interest or pleasure in most of their usual activities and have also experienced several of the signs and symptoms across at least three of the categories in the list below.

Feelings caused by depression

A person with depression may feel:

  • sad
  • miserable
  • unhappy
  • irratable
  • overwhelmed
  • guilty
  • frustrated
  • lacking in confidence
  • indecisive
  • unable to concentrate
  • disappointed

Thoughts caused by depression

A person with depression may have thoughts such as:

  • 'i'm a failure.'
  • 'it's my fault.'
  • 'Nothing good ever happens to me.'
  • 'i'm worthless.'
  • 'There is nothing good in my life.'
  • 'Things will never change.'
  • 'Life's not worth living.'
  • 'People would be better off without me.'

Behavioural symptoms of depression

A person with depression may:

  • withdraw from close family and friends
  • stop going out
  • stop their usual enjoyable activities
  • not get things done at work or school
  • rely on alcohol and sedatives

A person with depression may experience:

  • being tired all the time
  • feeling sick and 'run down'
  • frequent headaches, stomach or muscle pains
  • a churning gut
  • sleep problems
  • loss or change of appetite
  • significant weight loss or gain

It’s important to note, everyone experiences some of these symptoms from time to time and it may not necessarily mean a person is depressed. 

Treatment and support  

Depression is unlikely to simply go away on its own. In fact, if ignored and left untreated, depression can go on for months, sometimes years, and can have many negative effects on a person’s life.  

Every person needs to find the treatment that’s right for them. It can take time and patience to find a treatment that works.  

Different types of depression require different treatment. Mild symptoms may be relieved by: 

  • learning about the condition 
  • lifestyle changes (such as regular physical exercise)  
  • psychological therapy provided by a mental health professional or via online e-therapies.  

For moderate to more severe depression, medical treatments are likely to be required, in combination with these other treatments. 

Treatment for depression should start with seeing your doctor. Book an extended consultation to give you time to discuss your symptoms and treatment options. Your doctor may ask you to fill out a screening questionnaire or conduct some tests to rule out other conditions. 

Your doctor may refer you to a psychologist, social worker, counsellor or psychiatrist. You can access a rebate to see most of these professionals through Medicare. This requires that your doctor writes you a GP Mental Health Plan – ask them for more details. 

Where to get help 

 

 

Source: Better Health Channel, https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/conditionsandtreatments/depression 

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Other support services

BeyondBlue

Online counselling service

(Between 3pm & 12am): Free online chat with available counsellors.

Cost: Free

Grow support groups

Over 250 support groups in Australia. Visit website to find a group near you or call 1800 558 268.

Cost: Free

Black Dog Institute

Provides education and training for Workplaces, communities & schools on mental health and wellbeing through presentations, toolkits and consultancy services.

Cost: Free

eHeadspace

Free online chat with counsellors. You can email and book a time or just chat to someone when you go on, although there may be a waiting time. Also offers support for family members.

Mindspot

Free Mental Health Assessment which may be followed by recommendation of commencing a free 8-week treatment course or other referrals. Partners with Beyondblue and Macquarie University.

The MindSpot Clinic is a free service for Australian adults with stress, worry, anxiety, low mood or depression. We provide mental health Screening Assessments; Treatment Courses or help people find local services that can help.

Cost: Free

Lifeline: 13 11 14

Lifeline is a national charity providing all Australians experiencing a personal crisis with access to online, phone and face-to-face crisis support and suicide prevention services. Find out how these services can help you, a friend or loved one.

13 11 14 is a confidential telephone crisis support service available 24/7 from a landline, payphone or mobile.

Cost: Free
 
 
 
 
 

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